I Dreamt I Dwelt In Marble Halls

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I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls
With vassals and serfs at my side,
And of all who assembled within those walls
That I was the hope and the pride.
I had riches all too great to count
And a high ancestral name.

But I also dreamt which pleased me most
That you loved me still the same,
That you loved me
You loved me still the same,
That you loved me
You loved me still the same.

I dreamt that suitors sought my hand,
That knights upon bended knee
And with vows no maidens heart could withstand,
They pledged their faith to me.
And I dreamt that one of that noble host
Came forth my hand to claim.

But I also dreamt which charmed me most
That you loved me still the same
That you loved me
You loved me still the same,
That you loved me
You loved me still the same.

I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls or “The Gipsy Girl’s Dream” is a popular aria from The Bohemian Girl, an 1843 opera by Michael William Balfe, with lyrics by Alfred Bunn. It is sung in the opera by the character Arline, who is in love with Thaddeus, a Polish nobleman and political exile.[1] It has been performed and recorded by many artists including Enya.[2] It is said to bring bad luck if whistled or sung in a theatre.[3]
The song has been satirised repeatedly. Lewis Carroll‘s parody was published in Lays of Mystery, Imagination and Humour in 1855:[4]
I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls, And each damp thing that creeps and crawls went wobble-wobble on the walls..
Very popular in the 19th century, the piece also has many modern incarnations. The song makes a brief appearance in the 1946 film, Dragonwyck. The first line of the song is sung and “scatted,” in the number, “Swing,” from the 1953 Broadway show, “Wonderful Town.” The first line is also sung, (off-screen), by aspiring botanist, Seymour, in the 1960 cult classic film, “The Little Shop of Horrors.” More recently, an ambient, ethereal version was recorded by Enya for her Grammy-winning 1991 album, Shepherd Moons; her version also appeared on the soundtrack of the Martin Scorsese film The Age of Innocence.[5] Celtic Woman also recorded the piece. . A version by Sinéad O’Connor was on the soundtrack of the 1997 Irish film The Butcher Boy.[6] The song was also quoted by James Joyce in his story “Clay” from the book Dubliners. (Wikipedia)
The image is copyright: PerseoMedusa via Shutterstock
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About layanglicana

Author of books on Calcutta, Delhi and Dar es Salaam, I am now blogging as a lay person about the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. I am also blogging about the effects of World War One on the village of St Mary Bourne, Hampshire.
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