Iseult of Brittany: Dorothy Parker

1024px-DrapersTristanIsolde

So delicate my hands, and long,
They might have been my pride.
And there were those to make them song
Who for their touch had died.

Too frail to cup a heart within,
Too soft to hold the free —
How long these lovely hands have been
A bitterness to me!

Dorothy Parker

Iseult of Brittany

The image is Tristan and Isolde by  Herbert James Draper (1863–1920) via Wikimedia
After King Mark learns of the secret love affair between Tristan and Iseult, he banishes Tristan to Brittany, never to return to Cornwall. There, Tristan is placed in the care of Hoel of Brittany after receiving a wound. He meets and marries Hoel’s daughter, Iseult Blanchmains (Iseult “of the White Hands”), because she shares the name of his former lover. They never consummate the marriage because of Tristan’s love for Iseult of Ireland. During one adventure in Brittany, Tristan suffers a poisoned wound that only Iseult of Ireland, the world’s most skilled physician, can cure. He sends a ship for her, asking that its crew fly white sails on the return if Iseult is aboard, and black if she is not. Iseult agrees to go, and the ship races home, white sails high. However, Tristan is too weak to look out his window to see the signal, so he asks his wife to check for him. In a moment of jealousy, Iseult of the White Hands tells him the sails are black, and Tristan expires immediately of despair. When the Irish Iseult arrives to find her lover dead, grief overcomes her, and she passes away at his side. This death sequence does not appear in the Prose Tristan. In fact, while Iseult of the White Hands figures into some of the new episodes, she is never mentioned again after Tristan returns to Cornwall, although her brother Kahedin remains a prominent character. [Wikipedia]
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About layanglicana

Author of books on Calcutta, Delhi and Dar es Salaam, I am now blogging as a lay person about the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. I am also blogging about the effects of World War One on the village of St Mary Bourne, Hampshire.
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