Et J’entends Siffler Le Train: Richard Anthony

J’ai pensé qu’il valait mieux
nous quitter sans un adieu
je n’aurais pas eu le coeur de te revoir
mais j’entends siffler le train
mais j’entends siffler le train
que c’est triste un train qui siffle dans le soir
je pouvais t’imaginer toute seule abandonée
sur le quai dans la cohue des au revoirs
et j’entends siffler le train
et j’entends siffler le train
que c’est triste un train qui siffle dans le soir
j’ai failli courir vers toi
j’ai failli crier vers toi
c’est à peine si j’ai pu me retenir
que c’est loin où tu t’en vas
que c’est loin où tu t’en vas
auras tu jamais le temps de revenir
J’ai pensé qu’il valait mieux
nous quitter sans un adieu
mais je sens que maintenant tout est fini
j’entendrai siffler ce train toute ma vie.

Richard Anthony

This has been translated and sung in English by several people including Joan Baez and Julie Felix as ‘A hundred miles’, but I still prefer the French version. I am sorry that I am not allowed to embed any of the versions on You Tube, but it is worth the hop to their site to listen to this melancholy song, which I too shall now hear until the end of my days.

I thought it was better to leave each other without saying goodbye – and I wouldn’t have had the heart to see you again [before you left]. But I can hear the train whistling, how sad is the sound of a train whistling in the dusk. I could imagine you, abandoned and on your own on the platform, surrounded by so many others saying their good-byes. And I can hear the train whistling, how sad is the sound of a train whistling in the dark. I nearly ran to you, I nearly cried out to you, I could hardly hold myself back. How far away it is that you are going – will you ever have the time to come back – I thought it was better to leave each other without saying good-bye. I shall hear that train whistling till the end of my days.

About layanglicana

Author of books on Calcutta, Delhi and Dar es Salaam, I am now blogging as a lay person about the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. I am also blogging about the effects of World War One on the village of St Mary Bourne, Hampshire.
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