Cry Me A River: Julie London

Now you say you’re lonely,
You cry the whole night through.
Well you can cry me a river,
Cry me a river,
I cried a river over you.

Now you say you’re sorry,
For being so untrue.
Well you can cry me a river,
Cry me a river,
I cried a river over you.

You drove me, nearly drove me,
Out of my head;
While you never shed a tear.

Remember, I remember,
All that you said;
Told me love was too plebian,
Told me you were through with me

And Now you say you love me,
Well, just to prove you do,
Come on and cry me a river,
Cry me a river,

I cried a river over you [x4]

Julie London (September 26, 1926 – October 18, 2000) was an American singer and actress known for her smoky, sensual voice and languid demeanor. She released 32 albums of pop and jazz standards during the 1950s and 1960s, with her signature song being the classic “Cry Me a River,” which she introduced in 1955.
Cry Me a River” is a popular American torch song, written by Arthur Hamilton and first published in 1953. A jazzy blues ballad, “Cry Me a River” was originally written for Ella Fitzgerald to sing in the 1920s-set film, Pete Kelly’s Blues (released 1955) but the song was dropped. Fitzgerald first released a recording of the song on Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie! in 1961. The song’s first release and most famous recording was by actress/singer Julie London in 1955, backed by Barney Kessel on guitar and Ray Leatherwood on bass. A sultry performance of the song by London in the 1956 film The Girl Can’t Help It helped to make it a million-selling blockbuster (#9 US/#22 UK). Barbra Streisand sang this song on her 1963 debut album as the opening track of Side 1. In 1970, British blues rocker Joe Cocker made the chart with an upbeat rock rendition on the album, Mad Dogs and Englishmen. In 1995, British actress Denise Welch‘s double A-sideYou Don’t Have to Say You Love Me” / “Cry Me a River” spent three weeks in the UK Singles Chart, reaching #23. Canadian jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall recorded the song on her 2001 album, The Look of Love. In 2009, Canadian singer Michael Bublé entered the charts with a big-band jazz version, which is also the opening track of his fourth album Crazy Love. This adaption of the song was used in the BBC‘s advertising for, and theme music for coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

About layanglicana

Author of books on Calcutta, Delhi and Dar es Salaam, I am now blogging as a lay person about the Church of England and the Anglican Communion. I am also blogging about the effects of World War One on the village of St Mary Bourne, Hampshire.
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